BOOK REVIEWS

Dolores Huerta Stands Strong: The Woman Who Demanded Justice (Biographies for Young Readers) Reviews

UPDATE TIME: 2019-05-28 
Review Score: 5 out of 5 star From 2 user ratings
ISBN:0821423290
LANGUAGE:English

"I'd give this one a 3.5. It is wonderful to see the life story of Dolores Huerta, a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2012, told here. It's easy to see that her own formative years in Stockton, California, provided later inspiration for her determination to fight for the rights of workers and to become involved in the feminist movement as she had witnessed first-hand how those with brown skin were treated and how low the wages for farm workers were. Along with Cesar Chavez, she founded the United Farm Workers, an organization that worked to improve working conditions for farm laborers as well as to raise their wages. Interestingly, Dolores quit her job as a teacher in order to become involved in this movement after seeing the conditions in which her students lived and how they dressed to come to school. This decision meant that she barely had enough to feed and care for her own children, but somehow, they survived, inspired by their mother's dedication to become involved in civic matters as well. While I would have loved to know more about how they managed to cope with their mother's frequent absences, I finished the book filled with admiration for this woman's determination to right the wrongs that she saw in the world, even at great cost to herself. There are several photographs and source notes for those eager to learn more, and the story has been told in lively, engaging fashion, taking care not to simply glorify Huerta, but to mention some of her own flaws. For those curious as to the origin of President Barack Obama's rallying cry of "Yes, we can!", the answer will be found here, credited to Huerta. This one is a good addition to a history or social studies collection dedicated to individuals who made a difference. " said.

"Copy provided by the publisher

Born in 1930 to a family involved in coal mining in New Mexico and in agricultural work when economics demanded it, Dolores Huerta's life was tremendously influenced by historical circumstances. The difficulties of providing for a family during the Great Depression contributed to her parents' divorce, which in turn led to Dolores being raised in California. While her brothers occasionally worked in the fields, her mother refused to let her daughter experience that hardship. Instead, Dolores focused on her education and attended college in order to become a teacher, despite the disparities that plagued education of Hispanics at that time. It was during her years as an educator that she saw first hand how difficult the lives of her students were, especially those whose parents were farm workers. In 1942, the US government had instituted the Mexican Farm Labor Program (or Bracero Program) to fill labor shortages in agriculture, but those workers had scant protection against poor working conditions. Along with Cesar Chavez, Huerta saw a need to organize workers to fight for better conditions, and in 1962 the National Farm Workers Association had its first meeting.

From there, Huerta had much work to do, and a challenging personal life as well. Eventually raising eleven children and spending many years as a single mother, Huerta also had to fight against the male view of women at the time that felt that women should not be leaders but should work behind the scenes. Clearly, little progress gets made this way, but Huerta carefully planned her work to help as many people as she could, even if it meant not taking as visible a leadership position as she deserved. This might explain why she later was involved with the Feminist Majority, where her skills were better appreciated.

I hadn't realized that Robert Kennedy had been a supporter of the NFWA, but his untimely death was a blow to the organization. The group fought hard in the 1960s and early 70s, and made great headway, especially after the Grape Boycott to protest workers' exposure to chemicals. Even after that time, there were many issues to be addressed, and Huerta and Chavez worked hand in hand until his death in 1993.

There are so many interesting women who have done amazing things, and it is great to see more biographies on a wide variety of these movers and shakers. My library doesn't need more biographies of Helen Keller or Rosa Parks, (no matter how influential they were, we already have those books!) and I would love to see a lot more titles on women of whom I have never even heard.

This slim paperback is nicely illustrated with period photographs that give a nice overview of the time, and effortlessly weaves Huerta's personal story into the epic of her generation. Notes at the end of chapters give additional information about what society was like at the time, a crucial addition for young readers who may not have a deep sense of historical perspective and who believe that the world has always been the way it is right now.

Ohio University Press also published The Jerrie Mock Story and Kammie on First, as well as Missing Mille Benson, about the writer behind Carolyn Keene. Since Dolores Huerta's life coincided with several major social and political movements, her involvement in key issues offers a unique perspective of the twentieth century. This is a great addition to any collection and gives a fresh choice to readers who are investigating biographies.
" said.

"I'd give this one a 3.5. It is wonderful to see the life story of Dolores Huerta, a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2012, told here. It's easy to see that her own formative years in Stockton, California, provided later inspiration for her determination to fight for the rights of workers and to become involved in the feminist movement as she had witnessed first-hand how those with brown skin were treated and how low the wages for farm workers were. Along with Cesar Chavez, she founded the United Farm Workers, an organization that worked to improve working conditions for farm laborers as well as to raise their wages. Interestingly, Dolores quit her job as a teacher in order to become involved in this movement after seeing the conditions in which her students lived and how they dressed to come to school. This decision meant that she barely had enough to feed and care for her own children, but somehow, they survived, inspired by their mother's dedication to become involved in civic matters as well. While I would have loved to know more about how they managed to cope with their mother's frequent absences, I finished the book filled with admiration for this woman's determination to right the wrongs that she saw in the world, even at great cost to herself. There are several photographs and source notes for those eager to learn more, and the story has been told in lively, engaging fashion, taking care not to simply glorify Huerta, but to mention some of her own flaws. For those curious as to the origin of President Barack Obama's rallying cry of "Yes, we can!", the answer will be found here, credited to Huerta. This one is a good addition to a history or social studies collection dedicated to individuals who made a difference. " said.

"Copy provided by the publisher

Born in 1930 to a family involved in coal mining in New Mexico and in agricultural work when economics demanded it, Dolores Huerta's life was tremendously influenced by historical circumstances. The difficulties of providing for a family during the Great Depression contributed to her parents' divorce, which in turn led to Dolores being raised in California. While her brothers occasionally worked in the fields, her mother refused to let her daughter experience that hardship. Instead, Dolores focused on her education and attended college in order to become a teacher, despite the disparities that plagued education of Hispanics at that time. It was during her years as an educator that she saw first hand how difficult the lives of her students were, especially those whose parents were farm workers. In 1942, the US government had instituted the Mexican Farm Labor Program (or Bracero Program) to fill labor shortages in agriculture, but those workers had scant protection against poor working conditions. Along with Cesar Chavez, Huerta saw a need to organize workers to fight for better conditions, and in 1962 the National Farm Workers Association had its first meeting.

From there, Huerta had much work to do, and a challenging personal life as well. Eventually raising eleven children and spending many years as a single mother, Huerta also had to fight against the male view of women at the time that felt that women should not be leaders but should work behind the scenes. Clearly, little progress gets made this way, but Huerta carefully planned her work to help as many people as she could, even if it meant not taking as visible a leadership position as she deserved. This might explain why she later was involved with the Feminist Majority, where her skills were better appreciated.

I hadn't realized that Robert Kennedy had been a supporter of the NFWA, but his untimely death was a blow to the organization. The group fought hard in the 1960s and early 70s, and made great headway, especially after the Grape Boycott to protest workers' exposure to chemicals. Even after that time, there were many issues to be addressed, and Huerta and Chavez worked hand in hand until his death in 1993.

There are so many interesting women who have done amazing things, and it is great to see more biographies on a wide variety of these movers and shakers. My library doesn't need more biographies of Helen Keller or Rosa Parks, (no matter how influential they were, we already have those books!) and I would love to see a lot more titles on women of whom I have never even heard.

This slim paperback is nicely illustrated with period photographs that give a nice overview of the time, and effortlessly weaves Huerta's personal story into the epic of her generation. Notes at the end of chapters give additional information about what society was like at the time, a crucial addition for young readers who may not have a deep sense of historical perspective and who believe that the world has always been the way it is right now.

Ohio University Press also published The Jerrie Mock Story and Kammie on First, as well as Missing Mille Benson, about the writer behind Carolyn Keene. Since Dolores Huerta's life coincided with several major social and political movements, her involvement in key issues offers a unique perspective of the twentieth century. This is a great addition to any collection and gives a fresh choice to readers who are investigating biographies.
" said.

"I'd give this one a 3.5. It is wonderful to see the life story of Dolores Huerta, a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2012, told here. It's easy to see that her own formative years in Stockton, California, provided later inspiration for her determination to fight for the rights of workers and to become involved in the feminist movement as she had witnessed first-hand how those with brown skin were treated and how low the wages for farm workers were. Along with Cesar Chavez, she founded the United Farm Workers, an organization that worked to improve working conditions for farm laborers as well as to raise their wages. Interestingly, Dolores quit her job as a teacher in order to become involved in this movement after seeing the conditions in which her students lived and how they dressed to come to school. This decision meant that she barely had enough to feed and care for her own children, but somehow, they survived, inspired by their mother's dedication to become involved in civic matters as well. While I would have loved to know more about how they managed to cope with their mother's frequent absences, I finished the book filled with admiration for this woman's determination to right the wrongs that she saw in the world, even at great cost to herself. There are several photographs and source notes for those eager to learn more, and the story has been told in lively, engaging fashion, taking care not to simply glorify Huerta, but to mention some of her own flaws. For those curious as to the origin of President Barack Obama's rallying cry of "Yes, we can!", the answer will be found here, credited to Huerta. This one is a good addition to a history or social studies collection dedicated to individuals who made a difference. " said.

"Copy provided by the publisher

Born in 1930 to a family involved in coal mining in New Mexico and in agricultural work when economics demanded it, Dolores Huerta's life was tremendously influenced by historical circumstances. The difficulties of providing for a family during the Great Depression contributed to her parents' divorce, which in turn led to Dolores being raised in California. While her brothers occasionally worked in the fields, her mother refused to let her daughter experience that hardship. Instead, Dolores focused on her education and attended college in order to become a teacher, despite the disparities that plagued education of Hispanics at that time. It was during her years as an educator that she saw first hand how difficult the lives of her students were, especially those whose parents were farm workers. In 1942, the US government had instituted the Mexican Farm Labor Program (or Bracero Program) to fill labor shortages in agriculture, but those workers had scant protection against poor working conditions. Along with Cesar Chavez, Huerta saw a need to organize workers to fight for better conditions, and in 1962 the National Farm Workers Association had its first meeting.

From there, Huerta had much work to do, and a challenging personal life as well. Eventually raising eleven children and spending many years as a single mother, Huerta also had to fight against the male view of women at the time that felt that women should not be leaders but should work behind the scenes. Clearly, little progress gets made this way, but Huerta carefully planned her work to help as many people as she could, even if it meant not taking as visible a leadership position as she deserved. This might explain why she later was involved with the Feminist Majority, where her skills were better appreciated.

I hadn't realized that Robert Kennedy had been a supporter of the NFWA, but his untimely death was a blow to the organization. The group fought hard in the 1960s and early 70s, and made great headway, especially after the Grape Boycott to protest workers' exposure to chemicals. Even after that time, there were many issues to be addressed, and Huerta and Chavez worked hand in hand until his death in 1993.

There are so many interesting women who have done amazing things, and it is great to see more biographies on a wide variety of these movers and shakers. My library doesn't need more biographies of Helen Keller or Rosa Parks, (no matter how influential they were, we already have those books!) and I would love to see a lot more titles on women of whom I have never even heard.

This slim paperback is nicely illustrated with period photographs that give a nice overview of the time, and effortlessly weaves Huerta's personal story into the epic of her generation. Notes at the end of chapters give additional information about what society was like at the time, a crucial addition for young readers who may not have a deep sense of historical perspective and who believe that the world has always been the way it is right now.

Ohio University Press also published The Jerrie Mock Story and Kammie on First, as well as Missing Mille Benson, about the writer behind Carolyn Keene. Since Dolores Huerta's life coincided with several major social and political movements, her involvement in key issues offers a unique perspective of the twentieth century. This is a great addition to any collection and gives a fresh choice to readers who are investigating biographies.
" said.

"I'd give this one a 3.5. It is wonderful to see the life story of Dolores Huerta, a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2012, told here. It's easy to see that her own formative years in Stockton, California, provided later inspiration for her determination to fight for the rights of workers and to become involved in the feminist movement as she had witnessed first-hand how those with brown skin were treated and how low the wages for farm workers were. Along with Cesar Chavez, she founded the United Farm Workers, an organization that worked to improve working conditions for farm laborers as well as to raise their wages. Interestingly, Dolores quit her job as a teacher in order to become involved in this movement after seeing the conditions in which her students lived and how they dressed to come to school. This decision meant that she barely had enough to feed and care for her own children, but somehow, they survived, inspired by their mother's dedication to become involved in civic matters as well. While I would have loved to know more about how they managed to cope with their mother's frequent absences, I finished the book filled with admiration for this woman's determination to right the wrongs that she saw in the world, even at great cost to herself. There are several photographs and source notes for those eager to learn more, and the story has been told in lively, engaging fashion, taking care not to simply glorify Huerta, but to mention some of her own flaws. For those curious as to the origin of President Barack Obama's rallying cry of "Yes, we can!", the answer will be found here, credited to Huerta. This one is a good addition to a history or social studies collection dedicated to individuals who made a difference. " said.

"Copy provided by the publisher

Born in 1930 to a family involved in coal mining in New Mexico and in agricultural work when economics demanded it, Dolores Huerta's life was tremendously influenced by historical circumstances. The difficulties of providing for a family during the Great Depression contributed to her parents' divorce, which in turn led to Dolores being raised in California. While her brothers occasionally worked in the fields, her mother refused to let her daughter experience that hardship. Instead, Dolores focused on her education and attended college in order to become a teacher, despite the disparities that plagued education of Hispanics at that time. It was during her years as an educator that she saw first hand how difficult the lives of her students were, especially those whose parents were farm workers. In 1942, the US government had instituted the Mexican Farm Labor Program (or Bracero Program) to fill labor shortages in agriculture, but those workers had scant protection against poor working conditions. Along with Cesar Chavez, Huerta saw a need to organize workers to fight for better conditions, and in 1962 the National Farm Workers Association had its first meeting.

From there, Huerta had much work to do, and a challenging personal life as well. Eventually raising eleven children and spending many years as a single mother, Huerta also had to fight against the male view of women at the time that felt that women should not be leaders but should work behind the scenes. Clearly, little progress gets made this way, but Huerta carefully planned her work to help as many people as she could, even if it meant not taking as visible a leadership position as she deserved. This might explain why she later was involved with the Feminist Majority, where her skills were better appreciated.

I hadn't realized that Robert Kennedy had been a supporter of the NFWA, but his untimely death was a blow to the organization. The group fought hard in the 1960s and early 70s, and made great headway, especially after the Grape Boycott to protest workers' exposure to chemicals. Even after that time, there were many issues to be addressed, and Huerta and Chavez worked hand in hand until his death in 1993.

There are so many interesting women who have done amazing things, and it is great to see more biographies on a wide variety of these movers and shakers. My library doesn't need more biographies of Helen Keller or Rosa Parks, (no matter how influential they were, we already have those books!) and I would love to see a lot more titles on women of whom I have never even heard.

This slim paperback is nicely illustrated with period photographs that give a nice overview of the time, and effortlessly weaves Huerta's personal story into the epic of her generation. Notes at the end of chapters give additional information about what society was like at the time, a crucial addition for young readers who may not have a deep sense of historical perspective and who believe that the world has always been the way it is right now.

Ohio University Press also published The Jerrie Mock Story and Kammie on First, as well as Missing Mille Benson, about the writer behind Carolyn Keene. Since Dolores Huerta's life coincided with several major social and political movements, her involvement in key issues offers a unique perspective of the twentieth century. This is a great addition to any collection and gives a fresh choice to readers who are investigating biographies.
" said.

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