BOOK REVIEWS

Enemy Child: The Story of Norman Mineta, a Boy Imprisoned in a Japanese American Internment Camp During World War II Reviews

UPDATE TIME: 2019-05-27 
Review Score: 5 out of 5 star From 7 user ratings
ISBN:0823441512
LANGUAGE:English

"Following a specific by, Norman Mineta, is a different experience in reading nonfiction about the Japanese internment because it's a more personal story. What his family structure was, what education and work was like, and then the war happened and all of a sudden the US turns topsy-turvy and decides to build makeshift, crappy camps in remote locations to house the Japanese (and Italians and Germans) after going to war with the Axis Powers.

Many of the information about the basics, I've read before, but as a nonfiction biography about it, with a human face to the story, it's captivating for the middle grade/YA audience-- and what a powerful title.
" said.

"While this book is aimed at the junior high - high school set, I still enjoyed it.

Living as I do in the Silicon Valley, it's hard not to know who Norman Mineta is. Still, this look into his experiences as a child at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center during World War II gave a different perspective. Norm worried about his parents' and older siblings' well-being more than he did his own; he was making friends and making the best of a horrible situation.

The main thing that stuck with me was the idea that little kids who were American citizens were treated as enemy combatants ... as, of course, were their parents and adult siblings. But we're talking about kids who were interested in playing baseball or listening to their radio shows here ... doing normal kid stuff, but still being rounded up and put behind barbed wire for no other reason but racism.

This book contains a lot of lessons that are applicable in today's political situation. Highly recommended.
" said.

"This is an excellent account of a baseball-loving boy who went from living the good life in San Jose, California, where his father ran his own insurance agency, to being detained in a Japanese internment camp until Thanksgiving 1945. Norman Mineta and his family were first evacuated in May 1942 after the bombing of Pearl Harbor led to widespread paranoia and xenophobia and President Franklin Delano signed Executive Order 9066. This order allowed civilians such as Norm, who was ten at the time, to be rounded up, stripped of their property, and kept in internment camps for the duration of the war. At first the family lived in barracks at one was a race track in Santa Anita before being moved to Heart Mountain internment Camp in Wyoming. Based on extensive research and interviews with Norm, who grew up to become a ten-term Congressman and the United States Secretary of Commerce, the story is filled with personal anecdotes as Norm describes the shock his family experienced as they were labeled enemies of their country and then lost their civil liberties. While it's clear that he made the best of a horrible situation, including overcrowding, loss of privacy, bad food, and the loss of their liberties, it is also just as clear that the government made a terrible mistake by detaining these Japanese Americans. Andrea Warren describes the experience from the eyes of young Norm, watching as the politics that he knew little about changed his life forever. The story begins before the Minetkas' incarceration, follows them to various camps, and then details their return home. Additionally, the narrative points out his involvement in the passage of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 in which the United States offered an apology for its actions and offered reparations to survivors of the incarceration. The book is filled with several archival photographs and artwork, and has the perfect title since young Norm and others even younger than him at the time were regarded as enemies of this country despite their citizenship. There's so much good to be said about this important book. It is infinitely readable and should be considered an essential purchase for any social studies or history class or a fine addition to a collection of books on civil rights. Norm's story and the reaction of some after Pearl Harbor will certainly bring to mind the attitudes of many after the Twin Towers destruction as well as some of the current rhetoric toward immigrants today. While the book shows how quickly some individuals are moved to hate those that they deem different than themselves, it also shows how others see rights that they want to fix or reach out helping hands when they are needed. I was pleased to see Bainbridge Island in Washington mentioned in this light as well as a college professor friend of Norm's father who rented the family's house so that it would still be theirs after the war. Young readers will be touched at one of Norm's great losses--his dog Skippy who was not allowed to accompany the family to the camps. " said.

"Following a specific by, Norman Mineta, is a different experience in reading nonfiction about the Japanese internment because it's a more personal story. What his family structure was, what education and work was like, and then the war happened and all of a sudden the US turns topsy-turvy and decides to build makeshift, crappy camps in remote locations to house the Japanese (and Italians and Germans) after going to war with the Axis Powers.

Many of the information about the basics, I've read before, but as a nonfiction biography about it, with a human face to the story, it's captivating for the middle grade/YA audience-- and what a powerful title.
" said.

"This is an excellent account of a baseball-loving boy who went from living the good life in San Jose, California, where his father ran his own insurance agency, to being detained in a Japanese internment camp until Thanksgiving 1945. Norman Mineta and his family were first evacuated in May 1942 after the bombing of Pearl Harbor led to widespread paranoia and xenophobia and President Franklin Delano signed Executive Order 9066. This order allowed civilians such as Norm, who was ten at the time, to be rounded up, stripped of their property, and kept in internment camps for the duration of the war. At first the family lived in barracks at one was a race track in Santa Anita before being moved to Heart Mountain internment Camp in Wyoming. Based on extensive research and interviews with Norm, who grew up to become a ten-term Congressman and the United States Secretary of Commerce, the story is filled with personal anecdotes as Norm describes the shock his family experienced as they were labeled enemies of their country and then lost their civil liberties. While it's clear that he made the best of a horrible situation, including overcrowding, loss of privacy, bad food, and the loss of their liberties, it is also just as clear that the government made a terrible mistake by detaining these Japanese Americans. Andrea Warren describes the experience from the eyes of young Norm, watching as the politics that he knew little about changed his life forever. The story begins before the Minetkas' incarceration, follows them to various camps, and then details their return home. Additionally, the narrative points out his involvement in the passage of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 in which the United States offered an apology for its actions and offered reparations to survivors of the incarceration. The book is filled with several archival photographs and artwork, and has the perfect title since young Norm and others even younger than him at the time were regarded as enemies of this country despite their citizenship. There's so much good to be said about this important book. It is infinitely readable and should be considered an essential purchase for any social studies or history class or a fine addition to a collection of books on civil rights. Norm's story and the reaction of some after Pearl Harbor will certainly bring to mind the attitudes of many after the Twin Towers destruction as well as some of the current rhetoric toward immigrants today. While the book shows how quickly some individuals are moved to hate those that they deem different than themselves, it also shows how others see rights that they want to fix or reach out helping hands when they are needed. I was pleased to see Bainbridge Island in Washington mentioned in this light as well as a college professor friend of Norm's father who rented the family's house so that it would still be theirs after the war. Young readers will be touched at one of Norm's great losses--his dog Skippy who was not allowed to accompany the family to the camps. " said.

"This is an excellent account of a baseball-loving boy who went from living the good life in San Jose, California, where his father ran his own insurance agency, to being detained in a Japanese internment camp until Thanksgiving 1945. Norman Mineta and his family were first evacuated in May 1942 after the bombing of Pearl Harbor led to widespread paranoia and xenophobia and President Franklin Delano signed Executive Order 9066. This order allowed civilians such as Norm, who was ten at the time, to be rounded up, stripped of their property, and kept in internment camps for the duration of the war. At first the family lived in barracks at one was a race track in Santa Anita before being moved to Heart Mountain internment Camp in Wyoming. Based on extensive research and interviews with Norm, who grew up to become a ten-term Congressman and the United States Secretary of Commerce, the story is filled with personal anecdotes as Norm describes the shock his family experienced as they were labeled enemies of their country and then lost their civil liberties. While it's clear that he made the best of a horrible situation, including overcrowding, loss of privacy, bad food, and the loss of their liberties, it is also just as clear that the government made a terrible mistake by detaining these Japanese Americans. Andrea Warren describes the experience from the eyes of young Norm, watching as the politics that he knew little about changed his life forever. The story begins before the Minetkas' incarceration, follows them to various camps, and then details their return home. Additionally, the narrative points out his involvement in the passage of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 in which the United States offered an apology for its actions and offered reparations to survivors of the incarceration. The book is filled with several archival photographs and artwork, and has the perfect title since young Norm and others even younger than him at the time were regarded as enemies of this country despite their citizenship. There's so much good to be said about this important book. It is infinitely readable and should be considered an essential purchase for any social studies or history class or a fine addition to a collection of books on civil rights. Norm's story and the reaction of some after Pearl Harbor will certainly bring to mind the attitudes of many after the Twin Towers destruction as well as some of the current rhetoric toward immigrants today. While the book shows how quickly some individuals are moved to hate those that they deem different than themselves, it also shows how others see rights that they want to fix or reach out helping hands when they are needed. I was pleased to see Bainbridge Island in Washington mentioned in this light as well as a college professor friend of Norm's father who rented the family's house so that it would still be theirs after the war. Young readers will be touched at one of Norm's great losses--his dog Skippy who was not allowed to accompany the family to the camps. " said.

"This is an excellent account of a baseball-loving boy who went from living the good life in San Jose, California, where his father ran his own insurance agency, to being detained in a Japanese internment camp until Thanksgiving 1945. Norman Mineta and his family were first evacuated in May 1942 after the bombing of Pearl Harbor led to widespread paranoia and xenophobia and President Franklin Delano signed Executive Order 9066. This order allowed civilians such as Norm, who was ten at the time, to be rounded up, stripped of their property, and kept in internment camps for the duration of the war. At first the family lived in barracks at one was a race track in Santa Anita before being moved to Heart Mountain internment Camp in Wyoming. Based on extensive research and interviews with Norm, who grew up to become a ten-term Congressman and the United States Secretary of Commerce, the story is filled with personal anecdotes as Norm describes the shock his family experienced as they were labeled enemies of their country and then lost their civil liberties. While it's clear that he made the best of a horrible situation, including overcrowding, loss of privacy, bad food, and the loss of their liberties, it is also just as clear that the government made a terrible mistake by detaining these Japanese Americans. Andrea Warren describes the experience from the eyes of young Norm, watching as the politics that he knew little about changed his life forever. The story begins before the Minetkas' incarceration, follows them to various camps, and then details their return home. Additionally, the narrative points out his involvement in the passage of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 in which the United States offered an apology for its actions and offered reparations to survivors of the incarceration. The book is filled with several archival photographs and artwork, and has the perfect title since young Norm and others even younger than him at the time were regarded as enemies of this country despite their citizenship. There's so much good to be said about this important book. It is infinitely readable and should be considered an essential purchase for any social studies or history class or a fine addition to a collection of books on civil rights. Norm's story and the reaction of some after Pearl Harbor will certainly bring to mind the attitudes of many after the Twin Towers destruction as well as some of the current rhetoric toward immigrants today. While the book shows how quickly some individuals are moved to hate those that they deem different than themselves, it also shows how others see rights that they want to fix or reach out helping hands when they are needed. I was pleased to see Bainbridge Island in Washington mentioned in this light as well as a college professor friend of Norm's father who rented the family's house so that it would still be theirs after the war. Young readers will be touched at one of Norm's great losses--his dog Skippy who was not allowed to accompany the family to the camps. " said.

"This is an excellent account of a baseball-loving boy who went from living the good life in San Jose, California, where his father ran his own insurance agency, to being detained in a Japanese internment camp until Thanksgiving 1945. Norman Mineta and his family were first evacuated in May 1942 after the bombing of Pearl Harbor led to widespread paranoia and xenophobia and President Franklin Delano signed Executive Order 9066. This order allowed civilians such as Norm, who was ten at the time, to be rounded up, stripped of their property, and kept in internment camps for the duration of the war. At first the family lived in barracks at one was a race track in Santa Anita before being moved to Heart Mountain internment Camp in Wyoming. Based on extensive research and interviews with Norm, who grew up to become a ten-term Congressman and the United States Secretary of Commerce, the story is filled with personal anecdotes as Norm describes the shock his family experienced as they were labeled enemies of their country and then lost their civil liberties. While it's clear that he made the best of a horrible situation, including overcrowding, loss of privacy, bad food, and the loss of their liberties, it is also just as clear that the government made a terrible mistake by detaining these Japanese Americans. Andrea Warren describes the experience from the eyes of young Norm, watching as the politics that he knew little about changed his life forever. The story begins before the Minetkas' incarceration, follows them to various camps, and then details their return home. Additionally, the narrative points out his involvement in the passage of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 in which the United States offered an apology for its actions and offered reparations to survivors of the incarceration. The book is filled with several archival photographs and artwork, and has the perfect title since young Norm and others even younger than him at the time were regarded as enemies of this country despite their citizenship. There's so much good to be said about this important book. It is infinitely readable and should be considered an essential purchase for any social studies or history class or a fine addition to a collection of books on civil rights. Norm's story and the reaction of some after Pearl Harbor will certainly bring to mind the attitudes of many after the Twin Towers destruction as well as some of the current rhetoric toward immigrants today. While the book shows how quickly some individuals are moved to hate those that they deem different than themselves, it also shows how others see rights that they want to fix or reach out helping hands when they are needed. I was pleased to see Bainbridge Island in Washington mentioned in this light as well as a college professor friend of Norm's father who rented the family's house so that it would still be theirs after the war. Young readers will be touched at one of Norm's great losses--his dog Skippy who was not allowed to accompany the family to the camps. " said.

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