BOOK REVIEWS

The Knight's Armor: Book 3 of the Ministry of SUITs Reviews

UPDATE TIME: 2019-05-27 
Review Score: 0 out of 5 star From 0 user ratings
ISBN:1250076846
LANGUAGE:English

"This humorous series has a lot going on but fans of fantasy or strong readers will likely see it through to the end. Many magical creatures and concepts are introduced throughout the book, which adds a lot of humor and action scenes, moving the plot along. Although The Knight’s Armor is the third book in the series, the first chapter gives enough background to catch up new readers to the current plot. The text is a bit wordy, but its humor is clever, especially the hilarious footnotes and absurd Ministry of S.U.I.T.s Handbook interjections that give fake scientific explanations for various concepts. Readers may appreciate the pop culture references, including Harry Potter and Indiana Jones. Children in grades 4-6 who give the series a chance will be enchanted enough by the characters and the humor to stick with these lengthier books." said.

"You have to be a certain kind of person to appreciate Paul Gamble's humor. I'll be honest. It's not for me. There is not one shred of reality in his books. 100% sarcasm to the extreme. If you're aiming for that type of humor, then The Ministry of S.U.I.T.s series should be at the top of your To Read list. You have to like footnote distractions and side tips from the Ministry manual. Or you can skip it all, like I did, and save your sanity.

Jack and Trudy have been Ministry operatives for three weeks and they just can't get a break. For the third time, something weird is going on at their school. They've managed to stop Blackbeard in book 1 and the Queen of Atlantis in book 2. Now they are dealing with Merlin. Let me just throw out some of the pieces Gamble manages to mash together into a story. There's health food bars that might be controlling people, a lost and found room that defies logic (like everything), a bottomless pit (literally), Excalibur, Merlin's movie set, and automaton knights and vacuum cleaners. In the midst of all the nonsense, you'll be educated about gravity and magnetism. If you get it, then good for you. Oh. And Trudy's mom is still missing.

Here's the thing. These books are so wild and crazy that there is no way you will be able to predict the ending. It amazes me that Gamble can take all this seemingly unrelated nonsense and actually put it together into a coherent story. My brain hurt by the end. But like I said, if you go for this sort of thing, there's no way you'll be disappointed.
" said.

"FIRST! I'm sorry, I couldn't help myself, mostly because I can't believe this book has been out for two months and I'm the first one to review it, but here we are (what are all the children's librarians doing with themselves?). So, Jack's been a member of the ministry of S.U.I.T.s for three weeks and it should surprise no one that once again Northern Ireland faces a dire threat. This time it takes the form of health food. Well, that's obvious, what could be more insidious. After one of their classmates turns into the hulk as a result of an allergic reaction, Trudy and Jack watch in horror as the country is consumed by a health food craze driven by the malevolent Mr. M, whose sinister schemes are as twisted as they are diabolical. I mean, how much more diabolical can you be than to try and kill the heroes without even introducing yourself or monologuing? It's bad manners at the very least . Even worse, he claims to have Trudy's missing mother in his power. THE FIEND! (I'm sorry, I'm feeling very melodramatic today). It'll take all of Jack and Trudy's resourcefulness if they hope to figure out what he's up to much less stop him.

So, three books in and Paul Gamble continues to delight with his zany sense of humor and oddball plots. This book made me laugh out loud repeatedly and I thought it was a significant improvement over book 2, which I enjoyed but found kind of rote. The only downside with these books is that frankly, they're more suited for adults or teens than kids because half the fun is how Gamble lies outrageously to the reader with his explanations of why things are. Given the way that these "facts" are presented I can see younger readers becoming very confused, which is a shame because the mental gymnastics and twisted logic that Gamble uses to support his bold-faced lying is quite ingenious and if you understand his purpose, hysterically funny, but it's something that parents and teachers need to be aware of (and it's an excellent excuse to read the book together, so you can pretend you're not reading it for yourself) as this is definitely a case where the reader needs to be aware of the difference between fact and fiction. That said, I loved this book and hope that Mr. Gamble has many more adventures in store for Jack and Trudy.
" said.

"Jack and Trudy have already saved Northern Ireland twice in the past 2 weeks, which means it's about time for a new bad guy to show up. Sure enough, a movie set has arrived at school with animatronic trolls, a farm has sprung up in the rugby field supposedly for the movie but it is run by a mad scientist who has his own food line and is pumping the population full of nutrients and minerals for some reason. Trudy just wants to ignore the movie thing, even though their friend David is totally getting sucked in, but she believes finding her missing mother is more important. And thus starts the two Ministry of SUITs agents' latest mission to save Northern Ireland and probably the world. Again.

This book totally snuck out. I didn't hear any news about it coming and suddenly my brother found out it was already released. Gamble has really outdone himself with the humor in this one. I had to share several of the Ministry bulletins and footnotes aloud with my husband because they were just too good not to share. (Most memorable were the thoughts on butterfly angst and chaos theory, archeologists and how movies don't portray their apparel accurately (Indiana Jones and the Sudden Onset of Heatstroke...so funny!), and the relationship of cows and Vikings.) Jack and Trudy's adventures are as zany and unpredictable as ever, with the full weirdness of the Ministry of SUITs plus a little Arthurian legend stuff thrown in. Gamble has quite possibly pulled off an even funnier riff on Arthurian legends than Monty Python and gang, and that's saying something. It was highly entertaining and quite funny, and I'm so very sad this is the last one in the series. Of course there's hope that Gamble will have a brilliant idea in a few years and release another one. Highly recommended to anyone who likes fantasy adventures of spy-like heroes generously sprinkled with random humor, heavy doses of sarcasm, and tongue-in-cheek-totally-made-up-logic.

Notes on content: No language issues. No sexual content. Perilous situations are faced but no one is seriously injured.
" said.

"This humorous series has a lot going on but fans of fantasy or strong readers will likely see it through to the end. Many magical creatures and concepts are introduced throughout the book, which adds a lot of humor and action scenes, moving the plot along. Although The Knight’s Armor is the third book in the series, the first chapter gives enough background to catch up new readers to the current plot. The text is a bit wordy, but its humor is clever, especially the hilarious footnotes and absurd Ministry of S.U.I.T.s Handbook interjections that give fake scientific explanations for various concepts. Readers may appreciate the pop culture references, including Harry Potter and Indiana Jones. Children in grades 4-6 who give the series a chance will be enchanted enough by the characters and the humor to stick with these lengthier books." said.

"You have to be a certain kind of person to appreciate Paul Gamble's humor. I'll be honest. It's not for me. There is not one shred of reality in his books. 100% sarcasm to the extreme. If you're aiming for that type of humor, then The Ministry of S.U.I.T.s series should be at the top of your To Read list. You have to like footnote distractions and side tips from the Ministry manual. Or you can skip it all, like I did, and save your sanity.

Jack and Trudy have been Ministry operatives for three weeks and they just can't get a break. For the third time, something weird is going on at their school. They've managed to stop Blackbeard in book 1 and the Queen of Atlantis in book 2. Now they are dealing with Merlin. Let me just throw out some of the pieces Gamble manages to mash together into a story. There's health food bars that might be controlling people, a lost and found room that defies logic (like everything), a bottomless pit (literally), Excalibur, Merlin's movie set, and automaton knights and vacuum cleaners. In the midst of all the nonsense, you'll be educated about gravity and magnetism. If you get it, then good for you. Oh. And Trudy's mom is still missing.

Here's the thing. These books are so wild and crazy that there is no way you will be able to predict the ending. It amazes me that Gamble can take all this seemingly unrelated nonsense and actually put it together into a coherent story. My brain hurt by the end. But like I said, if you go for this sort of thing, there's no way you'll be disappointed.
" said.

"FIRST! I'm sorry, I couldn't help myself, mostly because I can't believe this book has been out for two months and I'm the first one to review it, but here we are (what are all the children's librarians doing with themselves?). So, Jack's been a member of the ministry of S.U.I.T.s for three weeks and it should surprise no one that once again Northern Ireland faces a dire threat. This time it takes the form of health food. Well, that's obvious, what could be more insidious. After one of their classmates turns into the hulk as a result of an allergic reaction, Trudy and Jack watch in horror as the country is consumed by a health food craze driven by the malevolent Mr. M, whose sinister schemes are as twisted as they are diabolical. I mean, how much more diabolical can you be than to try and kill the heroes without even introducing yourself or monologuing? It's bad manners at the very least . Even worse, he claims to have Trudy's missing mother in his power. THE FIEND! (I'm sorry, I'm feeling very melodramatic today). It'll take all of Jack and Trudy's resourcefulness if they hope to figure out what he's up to much less stop him.

So, three books in and Paul Gamble continues to delight with his zany sense of humor and oddball plots. This book made me laugh out loud repeatedly and I thought it was a significant improvement over book 2, which I enjoyed but found kind of rote. The only downside with these books is that frankly, they're more suited for adults or teens than kids because half the fun is how Gamble lies outrageously to the reader with his explanations of why things are. Given the way that these "facts" are presented I can see younger readers becoming very confused, which is a shame because the mental gymnastics and twisted logic that Gamble uses to support his bold-faced lying is quite ingenious and if you understand his purpose, hysterically funny, but it's something that parents and teachers need to be aware of (and it's an excellent excuse to read the book together, so you can pretend you're not reading it for yourself) as this is definitely a case where the reader needs to be aware of the difference between fact and fiction. That said, I loved this book and hope that Mr. Gamble has many more adventures in store for Jack and Trudy.
" said.

"Jack and Trudy have already saved Northern Ireland twice in the past 2 weeks, which means it's about time for a new bad guy to show up. Sure enough, a movie set has arrived at school with animatronic trolls, a farm has sprung up in the rugby field supposedly for the movie but it is run by a mad scientist who has his own food line and is pumping the population full of nutrients and minerals for some reason. Trudy just wants to ignore the movie thing, even though their friend David is totally getting sucked in, but she believes finding her missing mother is more important. And thus starts the two Ministry of SUITs agents' latest mission to save Northern Ireland and probably the world. Again.

This book totally snuck out. I didn't hear any news about it coming and suddenly my brother found out it was already released. Gamble has really outdone himself with the humor in this one. I had to share several of the Ministry bulletins and footnotes aloud with my husband because they were just too good not to share. (Most memorable were the thoughts on butterfly angst and chaos theory, archeologists and how movies don't portray their apparel accurately (Indiana Jones and the Sudden Onset of Heatstroke...so funny!), and the relationship of cows and Vikings.) Jack and Trudy's adventures are as zany and unpredictable as ever, with the full weirdness of the Ministry of SUITs plus a little Arthurian legend stuff thrown in. Gamble has quite possibly pulled off an even funnier riff on Arthurian legends than Monty Python and gang, and that's saying something. It was highly entertaining and quite funny, and I'm so very sad this is the last one in the series. Of course there's hope that Gamble will have a brilliant idea in a few years and release another one. Highly recommended to anyone who likes fantasy adventures of spy-like heroes generously sprinkled with random humor, heavy doses of sarcasm, and tongue-in-cheek-totally-made-up-logic.

Notes on content: No language issues. No sexual content. Perilous situations are faced but no one is seriously injured.
" said.

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