BOOK REVIEWS

Hector: A Boy, A Protest, and the Photograph that Changed Apartheid Reviews

UPDATE TIME: 2019-05-27 
Review Score: 4 out of 5 star From 0 user ratings
ISBN:1624146910
LANGUAGE:English

"Wow. What a beautiful tribute to such a tragedy. Adrienne Wright does an amazing job of introducing young readers to Soweto culture in South Africa during the 1970's apartheid oppression. By cleverly using the perspectives of three individuals, we see from multiple angles how the ruling government hurts those most vulnerable. Beautifully illustrated is soft tones to contrast the harshness of oppression, this is a powerful nonfiction book that children can engage with in safe place, yet see the realities of an imperfect and unbalanced world." said.

"Wow. What a beautiful tribute to such a tragedy. Adrienne Wright does an amazing job of introducing young readers to Soweto culture in South Africa during the 1970's apartheid oppression. By cleverly using the perspectives of three individuals, we see from multiple angles how the ruling government hurts those most vulnerable. Beautifully illustrated is soft tones to contrast the harshness of oppression, this is a powerful nonfiction book that children can engage with in safe place, yet see the realities of an imperfect and unbalanced world." said.

"Wow. What a beautiful tribute to such a tragedy. Adrienne Wright does an amazing job of introducing young readers to Soweto culture in South Africa during the 1970's apartheid oppression. By cleverly using the perspectives of three individuals, we see from multiple angles how the ruling government hurts those most vulnerable. Beautifully illustrated is soft tones to contrast the harshness of oppression, this is a powerful nonfiction book that children can engage with in safe place, yet see the realities of an imperfect and unbalanced world." said.

"Wow. What a beautiful tribute to such a tragedy. Adrienne Wright does an amazing job of introducing young readers to Soweto culture in South Africa during the 1970's apartheid oppression. By cleverly using the perspectives of three individuals, we see from multiple angles how the ruling government hurts those most vulnerable. Beautifully illustrated is soft tones to contrast the harshness of oppression, this is a powerful nonfiction book that children can engage with in safe place, yet see the realities of an imperfect and unbalanced world." said.

"Wow. What a beautiful tribute to such a tragedy. Adrienne Wright does an amazing job of introducing young readers to Soweto culture in South Africa during the 1970's apartheid oppression. By cleverly using the perspectives of three individuals, we see from multiple angles how the ruling government hurts those most vulnerable. Beautifully illustrated is soft tones to contrast the harshness of oppression, this is a powerful nonfiction book that children can engage with in safe place, yet see the realities of an imperfect and unbalanced world." said.

"Wow. What a beautiful tribute to such a tragedy. Adrienne Wright does an amazing job of introducing young readers to Soweto culture in South Africa during the 1970's apartheid oppression. By cleverly using the perspectives of three individuals, we see from multiple angles how the ruling government hurts those most vulnerable. Beautifully illustrated is soft tones to contrast the harshness of oppression, this is a powerful nonfiction book that children can engage with in safe place, yet see the realities of an imperfect and unbalanced world." said.

"Wow. What a beautiful tribute to such a tragedy. Adrienne Wright does an amazing job of introducing young readers to Soweto culture in South Africa during the 1970's apartheid oppression. By cleverly using the perspectives of three individuals, we see from multiple angles how the ruling government hurts those most vulnerable. Beautifully illustrated is soft tones to contrast the harshness of oppression, this is a powerful nonfiction book that children can engage with in safe place, yet see the realities of an imperfect and unbalanced world." said.

"Wow. What a beautiful tribute to such a tragedy. Adrienne Wright does an amazing job of introducing young readers to Soweto culture in South Africa during the 1970's apartheid oppression. By cleverly using the perspectives of three individuals, we see from multiple angles how the ruling government hurts those most vulnerable. Beautifully illustrated is soft tones to contrast the harshness of oppression, this is a powerful nonfiction book that children can engage with in safe place, yet see the realities of an imperfect and unbalanced world." said.

July 2019 New Book:

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