BOOK REVIEWS

The Glory Field Reviews

UPDATE TIME: 2018-05-14 
Review Score: 4 out of 5 star From 74 user ratings
ISBN:054505575X
LANGUAGE:English

"The Glory Field follows the Lewis family for generations, from Muhammad Bilal, a slave brought from Africa, to Malcolm Lewis, a young man who is looking for his identity as a black man in America. Muhammad's shackles are passed down from generation to generation; the shackles, along with a small plot of land called the Glory Field, symbolize the stuggles and triumphs of the family.

I described this to my students as Roots for young adults. The Glory Field is a beautifully written, moving story about a family's struggle to maintain its humanity after the horrors of slavery and its aftermath. Each section shows how the people of each generation are connected to those who came before. I cannot say enough about this book. Another must read.
" said.

"Because the book was almost like a set of short stories, it was hard to connect to the characters and stay intrigued with the focus completely shifting every 30-40 pages or so. The dialogue was also quite boring at times. However, I thought that it was fantastic to see the threads of family, unity, pride, freedom, and overcoming affliction/racism/suffering through the multigenerational story. By the time I reached the end I felt it was definitely worth the read, but in the midst of it, it was almost a painful trudge. It is deffinitely a slower paced novel, and while it's strength and purpose deffinitely aren't in the character arcs/stories/answers...I think it's the overall themes that carry the weight of the book. I think the snippets into the lives of these men and women and the histoprical events surrounding them make the reader look at the overall picture instead of the individuals. It's deffinitely a different type of book in that regard and that's why I think it would be better appreciated the second time around.
" said.

"The book "The Glory Field" by Walter Dean Meyers is a gripping novel that completely portrays the story of a black family from the old times of slavery to the here and now of modern times. During the book, you are taken into five different lives, each differing in the generation they are living in and the crisis' they are facing. the similarity that is shared between the teenagers is that each grows in their maturity level through the struggle of the crisis they face. This amazing book perfectly combines five different teens with five different stories which all together tell the story of the family living on land that was once occupied through their ancestors who were slaves in past times. The changing and differing stories help create excitement and bewilderment in the readers mind. I would recommend this book to anyone who would like to see and read about the different struggles of five teens, and how they grow into maturity.




Level 3 Question: How do you gauge a persons maturity in society?
" said.

"I liked the idea of this book, but I found the reality to be slow, dull, and unconnected. The image of the glory field reappeared from time to time, but not compellingly enough, not like the trees of Mildred D. Taylor's "Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry."



The author's idea to follow a family from slavery in the 1700s through today was excellent, but I found nearly every time period bogged down in long dialogue instead of character development or plot - just people talking and talking and talking, especially the scenesfrom the 1960s. There are gems in here: the discussion between the shop manager and Tommy was powerful, and a paragraph in the epilogue about the chains was moving as well. But overall I was bored! I wanted to be moved, but I found that the slices of life from different time periods meant to reveal this family's struggles and achievements through the years, were not clearly presented enough to be compelling.



I think instead of using this book in class, I would use a several different books to present the different time periods. Once again, I highly recommend Mildred D. Taylor's books, including the shorter novellas like "The Bridge" and "The Well."
" said.

"Published by Scholastic in January of 1994.

The Glory Field is the story of an African-American family and their tie to a piece of land on Curry Island in South Carolina.

Reminiscent of the James Michener sagas that follow the same format, The Glory Field is not nearly as detailed or as rich as a Michener selection. However, Michener's primary audience was adults and Myers' intended audience is young adults, most of whom would not have the patience or the courage to pick up a 1,000+ page book.

Myers has broken this book up into a series of six stories, snapshots of the Lewis family throughout nearly 250 years of history. The quality of the stories goes up and down. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th stories are so-so. The first is vivid, strong and way too short. The last two are so strong that, in my mind, they saved the book. I was considering not including it in my classroom library because of the middle stories - they drug along and just didn't have any pizazz - they were historically accurate - just with no zip.

So, final grade: 4 stars out of 5 (and a place in my classroom library!)

http://dwdsreviews.blogspot.com/2012/...
" said.

"My students will soon be reading this book and I had to stay on top of things to read it before they did.

I thought this was an interesting story, especially in its narration. All told, the story covers something like 250 years of Lewis family history. It begins with their first ancestor as he was brought over from Africa on a slave ship and continues through their family tree from there.

I thought the narration was really cool, once I got used to it. We get to see a snippet of what life was like for most of the generations. It skips a few here and there to jump to well-known eras, but the missing generations still get some screen time. I liked the way it focused on a little history in certain times like the Civil War, Restoration, the Depression, and the 1960s. They're (nearly) all time periods I like to focus my attention anyway. This was just another way of telling the story.

I found myself liking most of the narrators as well, like Lizzy and Tommy. Tommy...that boy had some courage, let me tell you. But the other narrators were great as well, like Malcolm and Luvinia. Her story actually probably stuck with me the most out of these.

I think it's also a really cool theme to look at what "family" means. To the Lewis's, it was pride in who they were, where they came from, and what they had overcome. It's fantastic that they have a family tree all lined out and that they knew the story of their ancestors. Too many of us lose that when there are so many fascinating people in our pasts. If anything, this book pushed me more to look into my own family tree.

Lovely story. Inventive narration.
" said.

" This book changed my life when i first read it when i was a teen. Till this day this book is my top five greatest books of all time. " said.

" Another good story by Mr.Myers. " said.

July 2018 New Book:

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