BOOK REVIEWS

You Wouldn't Want to Live Without Electricity Reviews

UPDATE TIME: 2019-11-14 
Review Score: 5 out of 5 star From 2 user ratings
ISBN:0531213072
LANGUAGE:English

"This is an interesting and informative book about electricity. We all learned quite a bit from reading it, and the short anecdotes really helped to spice up the narrative.

The information presented in this book is quite a bit more dense than what we've typically seen in other You Wouldn't Want to... books and it may be a bit too much for younger children.

I liked the description of the various experiments children can conduct. I appreciated the safety precautions, and I would strongly recommend parents supervise the experiments.

Even though we have a coal power plant located in close proximity to our home in West Virginia, I learned a more about how a coal plant operates.

Additionally, I learned that "nearly half of all electricity is made by burning coal." (p. 24) I thought our nation had transitioned more to nuclear and other renewable sources.

The last few pages concentrated on alternative sources for electricity and ways we can help conseve it.

Not much detail is provided for any of the topics, so it's more of an overview than anything. If a child's interest is piqued by a topic, I would recommend other books that focus more in depth on it.

We read this book independently and enjoyed the science/history lesson. We will certainly look for more of these books at our local library.

interesting quote:

"Our modern word 'electricity,' first used in the 17th century, comes from the ancient Greek word for amber - elektron." (p. 10)

new words: hypocaust, pyroelectricity
" said.

" ~I learned that batteries have north Poles and South Poles just like magnets~ " said.

" Hurricane Harvey cut our electricity for 4 days, and I grew up without electricity and water, sometimes. I would be reverted back to caveman days--all I can do is flip a switch. Same as cars, TV or any other thing other people have invented. " said.

" This is another great and informative book if this series. What I liked about this book is that it includes experiments that kids can do to help demonstrate the concepts outlined in the book. I read these to my Kindergarten-age son, and he is so fascinated by them and asks lots of questions, which sparks interesting discussions. " said.

"This is an interesting and informative book about electricity. We all learned quite a bit from reading it, and the short anecdotes really helped to spice up the narrative.

The information presented in this book is quite a bit more dense than what we've typically seen in other You Wouldn't Want to... books and it may be a bit too much for younger children.

I liked the description of the various experiments children can conduct. I appreciated the safety precautions, and I would strongly recommend parents supervise the experiments.

Even though we have a coal power plant located in close proximity to our home in West Virginia, I learned a more about how a coal plant operates.

Additionally, I learned that "nearly half of all electricity is made by burning coal." (p. 24) I thought our nation had transitioned more to nuclear and other renewable sources.

The last few pages concentrated on alternative sources for electricity and ways we can help conseve it.

Not much detail is provided for any of the topics, so it's more of an overview than anything. If a child's interest is piqued by a topic, I would recommend other books that focus more in depth on it.

We read this book independently and enjoyed the science/history lesson. We will certainly look for more of these books at our local library.

interesting quote:

"Our modern word 'electricity,' first used in the 17th century, comes from the ancient Greek word for amber - elektron." (p. 10)

new words: hypocaust, pyroelectricity
" said.

" ~I learned that batteries have north Poles and South Poles just like magnets~ " said.

" Hurricane Harvey cut our electricity for 4 days, and I grew up without electricity and water, sometimes. I would be reverted back to caveman days--all I can do is flip a switch. Same as cars, TV or any other thing other people have invented. " said.

" This is another great and informative book if this series. What I liked about this book is that it includes experiments that kids can do to help demonstrate the concepts outlined in the book. I read these to my Kindergarten-age son, and he is so fascinated by them and asks lots of questions, which sparks interesting discussions. " said.

December 2019 New Book:

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