BOOK REVIEWS

Ruin and Rising (The Grisha Trilogy) Reviews

UPDATE TIME: 2019-07-22 
Review Score: 4 out of 5 star From 430 user ratings
ISBN:080509461X
LANGUAGE:English

"This review is mostly gifs bc I just cannot write proper English words and the only English word that I am able to write is the word "fuck" and there is enough of that if you scroll down.

Mal
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Alina
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The Plot
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The Darkling
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The Ending
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If you don't want a whole fuck migraine, don't scroll down. :))


*eye twitches*
*closes book and stares off into the distance*
*takes a deep breath*
*implodes*

Literally trying not to fucking throw my fucking Ipad across the room. FUCK THIS BULL FUCKING SHIT.

FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCK 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:) :) :)

---
If there isn't enough The Darkling in this I'm going to shit bricks.
Also if (view spoiler)" said.

"I've never been more disappointed with a book in my life. Probably because I've invested too much of my heart into this story and I expected to get at least something in return. This isn't the worst book out there, but the amount of potential squandered, the idea of what it could have been - it all makes me want to weep. I expected so much more from Leigh, but in the end, it turned out to be just another trope-ridden YA series.

More rant coming later.


***

We have a true cover, and everything is on fire. Was it the Firebird who set everything aflame? Was it Alina?
I'm sitting here staring at the cover, trying to deduce how the story is going to end, but it seems pointless. It just makes me all the more nervous. I hope it won't be one of those final installments you just want to throw against the wall. I mean, Leigh Bardugo must know, that while maybe about 20 % of fans root for Mal, the other 80 % love the Darkling, right? RIGHT?

image9

***
I know this is not the true cover, but every time I look at it, it seems kind if fitting for this book. Also, I have a feeling I'm going to either passionately love or hate it. Please, Leigh Bardugo, don't kill off the Darkling! Let him somehow redeem himself! Pleeease?!
" said.

"I actually did not hate the ending or relationship like many people told me I would. I can understand people’s frustrations with the outcome, but I felt like it made sense for the characters and, if I actually cared about them, I would be quite happy for their ending. Unfortunately, I still don’t care for anyone here, and felt like the majority of the story dragged around as we followed a “ragtag team of misfits” consisting of barely developed secondary characters led by bland main characters. Nikolai’s story arc in the second half was clearly a plot device to temporarily get him out of the picture. The Darkling remains underdeveloped as what could have been a compelling antagonist, instead reduced to a romanticized shell of a villain. Maybe I didn’t mind that the ending was anticlimactic because I was so eager for this trilogy to be over." said.

"In this finale, you'll find more incomprehensible nouns.


A previously important phoenix plot that quickly fizzles out.


Some weird girl who used to be beautiful is now ugly muddled body positivity message.


Mal gets a dumb tattoo on his back that roughly translates to "I am become a blade" or some other crap, and it just makes me think of a lot of my millennial friends who have regrettable tats just because they think it makes them look badass.
What they think they look like:

What they actually look like:


More words that you can't even wrap your head around with too many consonants and not enough vowels.


An anti-climactic climax.


Some weird the main characters and villain are all kinda related mess.


And an ending that kinda gives everyone a happy ending but still feels like it comes up too short.


My other reviews for The Grisha series:
Shadow and Bone
Siege and Storm
Six of Crows
" said.

"3.5 stars

Book Stockholm syndrome took me hostage with this series and now that it's over I don't know what to do. I started off this series not caring at all and by the middle of this third book I was sobbing on my kitchen floor. I guess you could say the series got better as it went along. I’m not sure about that but I do know half this book ripped my heart out. The other half pissed me off but if you read my review’s of Shadow and Bone and Siege and Storm that isn’t exactly rare for this series.

The rest of this is gonna be a mess of unorganized spoilers. This is your warning.

So, obviously, the most important part of this series is Nikolai (some people argue that it’s Alina and Mal’s relationship but lol let’s be real). I, like everyone else that has read these books, love him and he was, of course, the cause of my sobbing on my kitchen floor that I mentioned earlier. He was the most interesting and devastating part of this book series and I will forever be bitter about the shit he had to go through in this book. I know he didn’t have to kill the love of his life or anything but arguably he had the biggest struggle of any character in this series with that bullshit The Darkling did to him and it hurts my heart. Also because of The Darkling’s stupid treachery, Nikolai wasn’t nearly as present in the story as he should have been and I’m bitter. Where is the Nikolai trilogy???? I need it immediately. I need more Nikolai content after this drought of a book.

Anyway, moving on. I really enjoyed that a lot of the characters that were mostly background in the previous two books really came to life in this book. Zoya and David ended up being hilarious characters and I totally didn’t see that coming.

I still don’t get why everyone loves The Darkling. I mean half the time he made me want to rip my hair out and Alina killing him was possibly the best thing that happened the entire series but also he’s a really interesting antagonist and I begrudgingly admit that reading this story from his point of view would’ve been enthralling. I mean just imagine for a second: this story being told by him instead of Alina. Like damn that would change everything.

Speaking of Alina, maybe I should talk about her and by extension Mal. Here we are, you all saw it coming. I can’t simply talk about this series without talking about how utterly uninterested I am in Alina and Mal’s romance. It’s just boring and overdone idk man.

The worst part is I really enjoyed the concept of Mal as the third amplifier, I totally didn’t see it coming and it made me feel actual emotions towards their relationship. Like I was actually worried for Mal. Can you believe it? Idk maybe it makes me fucked up but I’m a sucker for sacrifices like that and the angst surrounding it was the perfect mix of satisfying and heartbreaking.

I honestly didn’t think Alina had it in her to kill Mal but she did and I was super impressed and upset and just satisfied with the story being done so well. You can imagine how cheated I felt when Mal suddenly was coming back to life. Like hello????? I’m still confused about how that even happened. Also, it was super annoying and convenient that Alina lost her powers just like Mal had always wanted. Oh yay, they can be together now! Yes, that was exactly what I wanted from this book! Ugh, I feel played.

Other than that little fact, I thought this book was great and it put me on an emotional roller coaster, which sadly I don’t get to experience much in my reading life. I’m happy I finally read this trilogy. I finally feel like I’m part of the club and I’m ready to move on to Six of Crows. The grisha verse is a rich, captivating world. The politics are super dark and twisted but so interesting to read about and I can’t wait for Leigh Bardugo to pull a Cassandra Clare and just continue this world forever.
" said.

"THIS SERIES IS BEING TURNED INTO A NETFLIX SERIES AND HOLY SHIT MY EXCITEMENT CAN NOT BE CONTAINED!!!!!!!

description

“Maybe love was superstition, a prayer we said to keep the truth of loneliness at bay."

Why you should read the Grisha trilogy:

1. The Darkling
2. Mal
3. Pirates and demons and magical birds
4. The Darkling
5. Nikolai
6. The Darkling
7. Mal and Alina
8. Mal
9. MAL
10. Malyen Fucking Oretsev

If you haven't gotten it yet, I'm kind of in love with Mal. And I know some people preferred the other heroes over him. Maybe because he wasn't as funny as Nikolai or as seductive as the Darkling. But I loved that boy from the start and Chapter 16 and the epilogue ruined my life. I read them 4 times. And I think when I'm done writing this review I'm going back to read them again.

What I also loved: how I was oddly okay with any way this could have ended. I actually kept going back and forth with how I wanted the story to conclude. Towards the last half, I HOPED it would end a certain way. I was PRAYING Alina would end up with a certain someone. And I can honestly say the ending was just perfection. PER-FREAKING-FECTION. I cried and weeped and laughed and I just thought it couldn't have been better.

The characters were realistic, fantastic, and fun. The plot twists were CRAZY. The Darkling is literally the most fascinating and intriguing character I have read about and I can't praise Leigh enough for creating someone like him. For creating this whole series that stayed true to its characters and theme from the very beginning. And for Mal. Thank you for Mal.

Fav quotes:

"In the end, maybe love just meant longing for something impossibly bright and forever out of reach."

"I am not ruined. I am ruination."

"I will strip away all that you know, all that you love, until you have no shelter but me."

"I would have been different too, without you. Weaker, reckless." He smiled slightly. "Afraid of the dark." He brushed the tears from my cheeks. I wasn't sure when they'd started. "But no matter who or what I was, I would have been yours."

"You are all I ever wanted. You are the whole of my heart."

"When evening fell, the boy would bring the girl a glass of tea, a slice of lemon cake, an apple blossom floating in a blue cup. He would kiss her neck and whisper new names in her ear: beauty, beloved, cherished, my heart.
They had an ordinary life, full of ordinary things - if love can ever be called that."


Get the complete series here: https://amzn.to/2SRp8ZY



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" said.

" Moral of the story: A woman should never show more strength and power than her boyfriend. Ladies, you must give up everything so you can be with your man.The end.....Also, fuck any defense for this ending. The fucking title is "Ruin and Rising", and by naming the book this, Leigh Bardugo completely misled everyone into believing this book would be something its not. Read this if you like heavily contrived romance that the actual plot suffers for. " said.

"“You are all I’ve ever wanted,” he said. “You are the whole of my heart.”


“He leaned against the window, and the gilded frame came into sharp focus. “Do you think it would be any different with your tracker beside you? With that Lantsov pup?”
“Yes,” I said simply.
“Because you would be the strong one?”
“Because they’re better men than you.”
“You might make me a better man.”
“And you might make me a monster.”



I really wanted to give 5 stars.I did! But from the beginning of the book until the middle it was boring :'(
But afterwards, it was so good!!! Finally, the redemption for all the characters!!It was the best ending she could give!!


(view spoiler)" said.

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