BOOK REVIEWS

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl: Squirrel Meets World Reviews

UPDATE TIME: 2019-07-10 
Review Score: 4 out of 5 star From 10 user ratings
ISBN:1484781546
LANGUAGE:English

" Middle School superhero!Squirrel girl is so fun! It's nice to have a middle school super hero with just normal middle school problems (making friends, being awkward, etc). I loved her parents, who were actually great parents unlike almost every parent in books for kids. I didn't care as much for the squirrel perspective chapters; though the jargon was impressive it just wasn't as fun. " said.

"This wasn't quite my cup of tea, but there were things I loved:

1. Doreen Green aka Squirrel Girl is sweet, spunky, and squirrely.

2. Doreen comments throughout the story via footnotes, but it's established at the beginning that you can skip the footnotes and still enjoy the story. There are some very funny footnotes, although it got to be a bit much for my taste. I appreciate that they were optional.

3. I really enjoyed Doreen's interactions with The Avengers.

I will definitely be recommending this one to superhero fans.
" said.

" Actual rating: 3.5"I'm sure real Super Heroes call their moms sometimes, too. Like Captain America would take his mom along with him, if she hadn't died in 1962 or whatever. She'd put on a star-spangled helmet, hop in the sidecar of his motorcycle, and shoot S.H.I.E.L.D. lasers at bad guys, shouting 'Leave my boy alone!' I bet you my last acorn that Cap's mom was totally awesome."SOMEONE WRITE SOME FANFICTION. PLEASE.As for the rest of the book, it was lots of fun. " said.

"This is such a cute middle grade book! A mix of txts and narrative the story follows Doreen who secretly calls herself squirrel girl as she moves to a new school, makes new friends with humans and squirrels, and fights MM who wants to be a supervillian. The parents in this story are so fun, as they are conflicted about how to protect their daughter and also are so proud of her special talents.
I was a little worried at the beginning that Doreen was going to be too annoying but by page 20/30 I really was starting to like her as a lovable, nerdy, lonely kid.
" said.

"4.5 stars
I would recommend this book to: squirrels, people who like squirrels, people who like nuts, people who like babies, people who like Shannon Hale, Marvel fans

A totally amazing book. It is written for 4th through 7th graders but I really really enjoyed it. It's a really easy read, I finished it on a day and a half. The writing style is great, the characters unique and lovable, the humor amazing and the cover is really neat too.
My only complaint is that the book is written for a younger audience, when Squirrel Girl is supposed to be 14. While this book would probably be enjoyed by most fourteen year olds, I feel it was aimed at younger readers. Perhaps to give them someone to look up to...?

My favorite part is definitely the writing style. It is always so upbeat, random and spontaneous. Just like a squirrel. Just like squirrel girl. It's awesome.

Also, Shannon Hale is one of the best authors ever and her and her husband, Dean Hale, make a perfect combo of writers.

Happy reading!!
" said.

"Oh my gosh, this is so much fun! One of the funniest, most charming and exciting reads of the year.

Squirrel Girl does it again! In her origin story in novel form, written by the wonderful Shannon and Dean Hale. Squirrel power - the unbeatable superheroine of Marvel - and where it all began...

Doreen Green is an adorable, optimistic and full of nutty energy girl of fourteen-years-old, born with a bushy tail and other squirrely attributes like two buck teeth, retractable claws, super agility and strength. And talking to squirrels. She, along with her parents, move into a new town of Shady Oaks in New Jersey, which is a rundown, petty crime-laden location in juxtaposition to her bright nature, with unfriendly and mean kids at her new school.

This set-up leads to Doreen steadily finding her calling, as a superhero she has always thought of herself in her head until now - Squirrel Girl! who saves other squirrels, dogs, babies, juvenile graffiti gang members, and LARPers taking things too far. A sinister plot involving a robotic takeover and specifically testing and challenging Squirrel Girl to boost some bad guy-wannabe's ego is going on, and the realities of being a (very young) hero in the modern internet age in the Marvel Universe soon begin to sink in for the ray of sunshine and ball of furry hugs that is Doreen Green. It is also here where she first meets her beloved squirrel sidekick, Tippy-Toe. Take that, Wolverine and your jacket!

With 'The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl: Squirrel Meets World', Marvel once again proves how fun it can be when it just goes along for the ride and doesn't take itself too seriously. The authors of the book play along with writing about a superhero world inhabited by colourful characters and crazy science, and you can tell they were having a blast with the silly material and making it all as charming and accessible as possible. It is an all-ages novel - so nice to see something inclusive for younger audiences for Marvel's superhero properties for a change - so it never gets too dark or mean-spirited (Asgard forbid in a Squirrel Girl story!), and nobody dies in it. Nonetheless it is so entertaining and heartfelt, I had a big smile on my face as I shot through the book in two days.

Doreen's lovable if naive personality is infectious; she is the imaginative child we as adults wish we could be again, living in our own worlds. She listens to and hums loud, upbeat music, and is so hyperactive that rare moments of exhaustion only make her move about even more. Plus she provides hilarious commentary in page footnotes throughout 'Squirrel Meets World', similar to how she would break the fourth wall in the comics; like a teen girl, child-friendly Deadpool. It is her coming-of-age hero's tale (tail, more like; yeah, she makes up funnier word play than me), where she is finding out who she is, and why she does what she does. Can Squirrel Girl be a true superhero? Or a joke, like her initial creation?

And squirrels are awesome little creatures. You learn so much about them on this adventure. Add in babysitting and you get a cute bundle of joy of a book full of robot action, carjacking, compromised dogs, text messages between Squirrel Girl and the Avengers (and Rocket Raccoon), and a talking courgette.

Doreen's parents, Dor and Maureen (get it? Doreen sure does), are as softhearted and scatterbrained as she is. They parent her so sweetly that grounding their kid is a foreign concept to them. They claim that she must hide her squirrel tail in public because people would get jealous of not having a tail themselves. Bless them; they were only trying to protect her from a cruel world where "freak" is still a normal, pejorative term in a world where superpowered humans, aliens and Norse gods exist. Young Doreen believes whatever her parents tell her, until she attempts to become a hero for her new home turf and she can't hide from the harsh reality any longer. But regardless, Maureen and Dor love and support their strange, unique daughter in her choices, unconditionally. They are a cracking, hysterically-funny couple, and surprisingly complex. And so is Squirrel Girl.

The friends she meets and makes aren't limited to the butt-kicking Tippy-Toe and her hundreds of squirrel kin, eating nuts in trees and scouting territories. There is Ana Sofia from school, a lonely deaf girl, also a POC, who is understandably tired of trying to communicate with people and explain her disability over and over again, and is prone to intense glaring. But she's really very sweet, and acts as the detective, computer programmer and hacker Intel person for Squirrel Girl. She loves socks, maths, comic books, and has a crush on Thor (who doesn't?). Ana Sofia would make a great superhero, in fact: it is colossally rare to see a deaf character in anything in the media, much less in a superhero story, and an origin story at that. A three-dimensional dark-skinned female with an honestly-depicted disability. Fantastic representation.

Speaking of which, ethnic minorities and people with dark skin are a constant in 'Squirrel Meets World', and even better, some white people are described as being white when we are introduced to them, negating the white-as-default narrative BS. Doreen has a family in Canada, too!

'Squirrel Meets World' has the makings of a Marvel goldmine. It came so close to getting five stars from me. However, I feel it falls a little flat in terms of its build-up to a battle climax to save Shady Oaks (and the world, possibly. Probably). The final showdown crams in a lot with little page-room for well-rounded development for the many characters, and everything is solved pretty easily. An attempt to sabotage Squirrel Girl's reputation via internet trolling and online abuse felt kind of tacked on for a reason to ensure her breakdown for the beginning of the book's third act (and for her friends to suddenly, seemingly abandon her when she needs them), and it could have been far more explored as commentary. The mystery villain is rather obvious - that this is a kids' book is no excuse - and doesn't get especially interesting until the final battle with the heroine, ironically enough. (view spoiler)" said.

" SQUIRREL POWER! I'm a massive fan of the SG comics, and I'm delighted that Shannon and Dean Hale have brought Doreen into a novel so well. This is geniunely exciting, clever, funny and wonderful, and I know readers will go NUTS for it. 8+*Please note: this review is meant as a recommendation only. Please do not use it in any marketing material, online or in print, without asking permission from me first. Thank you!* " said.

"This was really fun, and I'm glad it exists, especially for kids who might be turned off by graphic novels but are interested in the character of Squirrel Girl. Or just squirrels. IDK.

There is a lot of Marvel Universe injokey stuff (Doreen's texts to all the other Avengers) but I think it mostly would still be funny on some level even to kids who aren't as familiar.

I also loved that Doreen's friend is a hearing impaired Latina girl!

I will say that for me, personally, I didn't like it as much as I like Ryan North's comics (the humor is a little more silly and a little less...whatever Ryan North is), but, also, this book isn't really for me, and I think this will be a lot of fun for a lot of middle-grade readers.

I debated between 3 & 4 stars for this but I'm rounding up to 4 mainly for Tony Stark's text messages and Doreen's footnotes.
" said.

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