BOOK REVIEWS

How Deep Is the Ocean? (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 2) Reviews

UPDATE TIME: 2018-01-12 
Review Score: 4 out of 5 star From 3 user ratings
ISBN:0062328204
LANGUAGE:English

"Reviewed for School Library Journal:

K-Gr 3—This informative and richly illustrated volume brings to life the awe-inspiring vastness of the oceans. Readers follow a boy and girl as they venture from the shore's edge into the sea's sunlight zone (using scuba gear) to learn about phytoplankton and photosynthesis. The pair descend via a submersible into the twilight, the midnight, the abyssal, and, finally, the seldom-seen Hadal zone inside the Mariana Trench (nearly seven miles deep). At each level, the text describes how the children feel (the water pressure increasing as they scuba dive down to 100 feet) and what they see (meticulously labeled specimens, such as the sperm whale, the pink vent eelpout, the strawberry squid, and the tripod fish). Puybaret's illustrations, painted in vivid acrylics, are superbly detailed and visually intriguing. The artwork is so precise that detail-oriented viewers won't miss photographs. Math lovers will appreciate the mention of sizes and depths interspersed throughout the text. An ocean depth chart, graphs, suggested experiments, and a list of Internet resources for further study address multiple learning styles while facilitating expanded exploration of the topic. Kids will build vocabulary with terms such as bioluminescence, hydrothermal vents, and chemosynthesis. VERDICT This selection does not sacrifice appeal for information; a good addition for all science collections.—Suzanne LaPierre, Fairfax County Public Library, VA --This text refers to the Library Binding edition.
" said.

" This was actually a fun and interesting book to read but one that I am not sure really young kids would like or beginning readers as there are definitely some big science words thrown in even if they are described later on for the readers. But for those who want to chance it or even skip some of the science terms than that can also make for an interesting variation.

The book follows some children as they explore the depths of the ocean, how pressure works on the human body and even gives a cursory look into some of the weirder creatures to inhabit the depths. You also get to know the names of each layer of depths and how far you have to go to reach that then if your parent or adult allows you there is an experiment in the back of the book.

This is definitely one of the better books geared towards teaching children the ocean and even an adult can learn something new from it.
" said.

"Reviewed for School Library Journal:

K-Gr 3—This informative and richly illustrated volume brings to life the awe-inspiring vastness of the oceans. Readers follow a boy and girl as they venture from the shore's edge into the sea's sunlight zone (using scuba gear) to learn about phytoplankton and photosynthesis. The pair descend via a submersible into the twilight, the midnight, the abyssal, and, finally, the seldom-seen Hadal zone inside the Mariana Trench (nearly seven miles deep). At each level, the text describes how the children feel (the water pressure increasing as they scuba dive down to 100 feet) and what they see (meticulously labeled specimens, such as the sperm whale, the pink vent eelpout, the strawberry squid, and the tripod fish). Puybaret's illustrations, painted in vivid acrylics, are superbly detailed and visually intriguing. The artwork is so precise that detail-oriented viewers won't miss photographs. Math lovers will appreciate the mention of sizes and depths interspersed throughout the text. An ocean depth chart, graphs, suggested experiments, and a list of Internet resources for further study address multiple learning styles while facilitating expanded exploration of the topic. Kids will build vocabulary with terms such as bioluminescence, hydrothermal vents, and chemosynthesis. VERDICT This selection does not sacrifice appeal for information; a good addition for all science collections.—Suzanne LaPierre, Fairfax County Public Library, VA --This text refers to the Library Binding edition.
" said.

" This was actually a fun and interesting book to read but one that I am not sure really young kids would like or beginning readers as there are definitely some big science words thrown in even if they are described later on for the readers. But for those who want to chance it or even skip some of the science terms than that can also make for an interesting variation.

The book follows some children as they explore the depths of the ocean, how pressure works on the human body and even gives a cursory look into some of the weirder creatures to inhabit the depths. You also get to know the names of each layer of depths and how far you have to go to reach that then if your parent or adult allows you there is an experiment in the back of the book.

This is definitely one of the better books geared towards teaching children the ocean and even an adult can learn something new from it.
" said.

"Reviewed for School Library Journal:

K-Gr 3—This informative and richly illustrated volume brings to life the awe-inspiring vastness of the oceans. Readers follow a boy and girl as they venture from the shore's edge into the sea's sunlight zone (using scuba gear) to learn about phytoplankton and photosynthesis. The pair descend via a submersible into the twilight, the midnight, the abyssal, and, finally, the seldom-seen Hadal zone inside the Mariana Trench (nearly seven miles deep). At each level, the text describes how the children feel (the water pressure increasing as they scuba dive down to 100 feet) and what they see (meticulously labeled specimens, such as the sperm whale, the pink vent eelpout, the strawberry squid, and the tripod fish). Puybaret's illustrations, painted in vivid acrylics, are superbly detailed and visually intriguing. The artwork is so precise that detail-oriented viewers won't miss photographs. Math lovers will appreciate the mention of sizes and depths interspersed throughout the text. An ocean depth chart, graphs, suggested experiments, and a list of Internet resources for further study address multiple learning styles while facilitating expanded exploration of the topic. Kids will build vocabulary with terms such as bioluminescence, hydrothermal vents, and chemosynthesis. VERDICT This selection does not sacrifice appeal for information; a good addition for all science collections.—Suzanne LaPierre, Fairfax County Public Library, VA --This text refers to the Library Binding edition.
" said.

" This was actually a fun and interesting book to read but one that I am not sure really young kids would like or beginning readers as there are definitely some big science words thrown in even if they are described later on for the readers. But for those who want to chance it or even skip some of the science terms than that can also make for an interesting variation.

The book follows some children as they explore the depths of the ocean, how pressure works on the human body and even gives a cursory look into some of the weirder creatures to inhabit the depths. You also get to know the names of each layer of depths and how far you have to go to reach that then if your parent or adult allows you there is an experiment in the back of the book.

This is definitely one of the better books geared towards teaching children the ocean and even an adult can learn something new from it.
" said.

"Reviewed for School Library Journal:

K-Gr 3—This informative and richly illustrated volume brings to life the awe-inspiring vastness of the oceans. Readers follow a boy and girl as they venture from the shore's edge into the sea's sunlight zone (using scuba gear) to learn about phytoplankton and photosynthesis. The pair descend via a submersible into the twilight, the midnight, the abyssal, and, finally, the seldom-seen Hadal zone inside the Mariana Trench (nearly seven miles deep). At each level, the text describes how the children feel (the water pressure increasing as they scuba dive down to 100 feet) and what they see (meticulously labeled specimens, such as the sperm whale, the pink vent eelpout, the strawberry squid, and the tripod fish). Puybaret's illustrations, painted in vivid acrylics, are superbly detailed and visually intriguing. The artwork is so precise that detail-oriented viewers won't miss photographs. Math lovers will appreciate the mention of sizes and depths interspersed throughout the text. An ocean depth chart, graphs, suggested experiments, and a list of Internet resources for further study address multiple learning styles while facilitating expanded exploration of the topic. Kids will build vocabulary with terms such as bioluminescence, hydrothermal vents, and chemosynthesis. VERDICT This selection does not sacrifice appeal for information; a good addition for all science collections.—Suzanne LaPierre, Fairfax County Public Library, VA --This text refers to the Library Binding edition.
" said.

" This was actually a fun and interesting book to read but one that I am not sure really young kids would like or beginning readers as there are definitely some big science words thrown in even if they are described later on for the readers. But for those who want to chance it or even skip some of the science terms than that can also make for an interesting variation.

The book follows some children as they explore the depths of the ocean, how pressure works on the human body and even gives a cursory look into some of the weirder creatures to inhabit the depths. You also get to know the names of each layer of depths and how far you have to go to reach that then if your parent or adult allows you there is an experiment in the back of the book.

This is definitely one of the better books geared towards teaching children the ocean and even an adult can learn something new from it.
" said.

January 2018 New Book:

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