BOOK REVIEWS

Songs from the Loom: A Navajo Girl Learns to Weave (We Are Still Here) (We Are Still Here : Native Americans Today) Reviews

UPDATE TIME: 2018-06-27 
Review Score: 4 out of 5 star From 9 user ratings
ISBN:0822597128
LANGUAGE:English

" Beautiful photos, lovely stories, I'm excited to get to use this with my class this year! " said.

"I was excited when I realized the girl in this story is the author-photographer’s daughter. This book was published in 1995 and she was 10 years old at the time. I’d love to have an update about Jaclyn Roessel today, now more than fifteen years later.

The one non-vegan thing I kept when I started my vegan journey in 1988 is a Navajo rug my father gave me that he got while on a job in New Mexico. I still hate wool but I treasure the blanket. I still don’t approve of using sheep for human gain, but I admire the traditional ways of making these Navajo blankets that, in addition to sheep’s wool, include plant dyes, tools, songs/stories, certain techniques and pre-work, and teaching/mentoring.

Jaclyn and her author father live on the Navajo reservation and this is the story of how Jaclyn expressed interest in learning to weave and how her grandmother, her father’s mother, teaches her via traditional Navajo methods. Two traditional story songs about Navajo weaving are included in the narrative.

Some history and current conditions of the Navajo are also covered. There is a terrific map of the Reservation and surrounding area, and wonderful photos.

This is a photojournalism book. Roessel is Navajo and he works on a variety of projects but, when he can, his focus is on projects that document contemporary Navajo life from a Navajo’s perspective. This is one of the “We Are Still Here: Native Americans Today” series books, and they are created by Native Americans, and it seems at least one of the contributors is always a member of the tribe being featured.

Perhaps it’s because of my interest in weaving and the Navajo or because of the author-photographer’s love for his daughter, but of the books I’ve read so far from this series, this is my favorite of the ones that are about a specific child. The series has two kinds of books I’ve seen so far: this type that features a child and their activity and books that feature a traditional tribe custom or vocation or activity.
" said.

" Beautiful photos, lovely stories, I'm excited to get to use this with my class this year! " said.

"I was excited when I realized the girl in this story is the author-photographer’s daughter. This book was published in 1995 and she was 10 years old at the time. I’d love to have an update about Jaclyn Roessel today, now more than fifteen years later.

The one non-vegan thing I kept when I started my vegan journey in 1988 is a Navajo rug my father gave me that he got while on a job in New Mexico. I still hate wool but I treasure the blanket. I still don’t approve of using sheep for human gain, but I admire the traditional ways of making these Navajo blankets that, in addition to sheep’s wool, include plant dyes, tools, songs/stories, certain techniques and pre-work, and teaching/mentoring.

Jaclyn and her author father live on the Navajo reservation and this is the story of how Jaclyn expressed interest in learning to weave and how her grandmother, her father’s mother, teaches her via traditional Navajo methods. Two traditional story songs about Navajo weaving are included in the narrative.

Some history and current conditions of the Navajo are also covered. There is a terrific map of the Reservation and surrounding area, and wonderful photos.

This is a photojournalism book. Roessel is Navajo and he works on a variety of projects but, when he can, his focus is on projects that document contemporary Navajo life from a Navajo’s perspective. This is one of the “We Are Still Here: Native Americans Today” series books, and they are created by Native Americans, and it seems at least one of the contributors is always a member of the tribe being featured.

Perhaps it’s because of my interest in weaving and the Navajo or because of the author-photographer’s love for his daughter, but of the books I’ve read so far from this series, this is my favorite of the ones that are about a specific child. The series has two kinds of books I’ve seen so far: this type that features a child and their activity and books that feature a traditional tribe custom or vocation or activity.
" said.

" Beautiful photos, lovely stories, I'm excited to get to use this with my class this year! " said.

"I was excited when I realized the girl in this story is the author-photographer’s daughter. This book was published in 1995 and she was 10 years old at the time. I’d love to have an update about Jaclyn Roessel today, now more than fifteen years later.

The one non-vegan thing I kept when I started my vegan journey in 1988 is a Navajo rug my father gave me that he got while on a job in New Mexico. I still hate wool but I treasure the blanket. I still don’t approve of using sheep for human gain, but I admire the traditional ways of making these Navajo blankets that, in addition to sheep’s wool, include plant dyes, tools, songs/stories, certain techniques and pre-work, and teaching/mentoring.

Jaclyn and her author father live on the Navajo reservation and this is the story of how Jaclyn expressed interest in learning to weave and how her grandmother, her father’s mother, teaches her via traditional Navajo methods. Two traditional story songs about Navajo weaving are included in the narrative.

Some history and current conditions of the Navajo are also covered. There is a terrific map of the Reservation and surrounding area, and wonderful photos.

This is a photojournalism book. Roessel is Navajo and he works on a variety of projects but, when he can, his focus is on projects that document contemporary Navajo life from a Navajo’s perspective. This is one of the “We Are Still Here: Native Americans Today” series books, and they are created by Native Americans, and it seems at least one of the contributors is always a member of the tribe being featured.

Perhaps it’s because of my interest in weaving and the Navajo or because of the author-photographer’s love for his daughter, but of the books I’ve read so far from this series, this is my favorite of the ones that are about a specific child. The series has two kinds of books I’ve seen so far: this type that features a child and their activity and books that feature a traditional tribe custom or vocation or activity.
" said.

" Beautiful photos, lovely stories, I'm excited to get to use this with my class this year! " said.

"I was excited when I realized the girl in this story is the author-photographer’s daughter. This book was published in 1995 and she was 10 years old at the time. I’d love to have an update about Jaclyn Roessel today, now more than fifteen years later.

The one non-vegan thing I kept when I started my vegan journey in 1988 is a Navajo rug my father gave me that he got while on a job in New Mexico. I still hate wool but I treasure the blanket. I still don’t approve of using sheep for human gain, but I admire the traditional ways of making these Navajo blankets that, in addition to sheep’s wool, include plant dyes, tools, songs/stories, certain techniques and pre-work, and teaching/mentoring.

Jaclyn and her author father live on the Navajo reservation and this is the story of how Jaclyn expressed interest in learning to weave and how her grandmother, her father’s mother, teaches her via traditional Navajo methods. Two traditional story songs about Navajo weaving are included in the narrative.

Some history and current conditions of the Navajo are also covered. There is a terrific map of the Reservation and surrounding area, and wonderful photos.

This is a photojournalism book. Roessel is Navajo and he works on a variety of projects but, when he can, his focus is on projects that document contemporary Navajo life from a Navajo’s perspective. This is one of the “We Are Still Here: Native Americans Today” series books, and they are created by Native Americans, and it seems at least one of the contributors is always a member of the tribe being featured.

Perhaps it’s because of my interest in weaving and the Navajo or because of the author-photographer’s love for his daughter, but of the books I’ve read so far from this series, this is my favorite of the ones that are about a specific child. The series has two kinds of books I’ve seen so far: this type that features a child and their activity and books that feature a traditional tribe custom or vocation or activity.
" said.

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