BOOK REVIEWS

Facing Frederick: The Life of Frederick Douglass, a Monumental American Man Reviews

UPDATE TIME: 2018-01-16 
Review Score: 5 out of 5 star From 0 user ratings
ISBN:1419725467
LANGUAGE:English

""The whole history of the progress of human liberty shows that all concessions yet made to her august claims have been born of earnest struggle... If there is no struggle there is no progress.
...
This struggle may be a moral one, or it may be a physical one, and it may be both moral and physical, but it must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand.
...
If we ever get free from the oppressions and wrongs heaped upon us, we must pay for their removal. We must do this by labor, by suffering, by sacrifice, and if needs be, by our lives and the lives of others."
-Frederick Douglass, August 3, 1857

" said.

" Strong 3 1/2. I do love this author, and I definitely learned some things about Douglass. This would pair well with other books on a variety of topics. I just had a problem with some of the word choices. Assuming the errors are corrected in the final. " said.

" The pictures aided to the very well-researched telling of such a profound man in our Nation's history. My daughter learned quite a bit (9) as she was able to follow with ease the progress of Mr. Douglass's personal growth and gains against the time-period's hardships and war. Wonderful outline and sidenotes for such a wonderful story of courage! " said.

"To clarify, I felt the book was a biography targeted towards (very) young adults, with simple words, large font and colorful pages. Perhaps it is. In ya- fashion, I felt that the author took many liberties in assuming how Douglass *felt* during certain moments or giving reasons to why he acted as he did in certain situations. These assumptions read as just that: assumptions. Individuals were introduced with little background and no chart to keep track of who is who so I found that the names, for me, became jumbled and required rereading. I also take issue with calling Douglass a feminist- within the book he is recorded as dubbing the journey of women's suffrage not as important or critical as that of African Americans. In my mind, attending one conference of female leaders does not a feminist make. The titles given to Douglass, by the author, were rightfully earned at best but grasping for straws at worst- making the read a bit of a jumble on an already great man.

The book was educational and a fast read.

Advice for any edits: Douglass was undeniably a great and revolutionary man, but this seems a poor attempt at deification. I would have loved a list, and descriptions, of the people in Douglass' life to help keep track of names (or faces).
" said.

"Frederick Douglass really was a monumental American man as the title of Bolden’s new biography states. This book due to be released in January, 2018 (I had a galley) for the 200th birthday of the great man has 16 pages of notes, a selected bibliography and a timeline. In the galley there is also space for image credits and an index. The body of research that went into making this book a reality is clear. The fact that is reads like a rags-to-riches story means it will have appeal from middle school through high school. Bolden also does an impressive job of weaving details about photography into the narrative which makes this a book that also explores technology of the time. Facing Frederick calls upon its readers to recognize new documents and scholarship about the once-enslaved abolitionist. It’s also compelling to read Douglass’s words in breakout quotes and captions. “They treat us not as men but as dogs and expect us to run and do their bidding. You degrade us and then ask why we are degraded—you shut our mouths and then ask why we do not speak. You close your colleges and seminaries against us and then ask why we don’t know more.” —Frederick Douglas
This reviewer wonders if any modern leaders are as relentless and tenacious as Douglass. What an excellent biography and one that should be paired with Milton Melter’s Frederick Douglas In His Own Words.
" said.

""The whole history of the progress of human liberty shows that all concessions yet made to her august claims have been born of earnest struggle... If there is no struggle there is no progress.
...
This struggle may be a moral one, or it may be a physical one, and it may be both moral and physical, but it must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand.
...
If we ever get free from the oppressions and wrongs heaped upon us, we must pay for their removal. We must do this by labor, by suffering, by sacrifice, and if needs be, by our lives and the lives of others."
-Frederick Douglass, August 3, 1857

" said.

" Strong 3 1/2. I do love this author, and I definitely learned some things about Douglass. This would pair well with other books on a variety of topics. I just had a problem with some of the word choices. Assuming the errors are corrected in the final. " said.

" The pictures aided to the very well-researched telling of such a profound man in our Nation's history. My daughter learned quite a bit (9) as she was able to follow with ease the progress of Mr. Douglass's personal growth and gains against the time-period's hardships and war. Wonderful outline and sidenotes for such a wonderful story of courage! " said.

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